AAUW Sacramento Presents: Fall Showcase 2016

Saturday, Sept. 17
9:30 a.m. – Noon
Arden-Dimick Library
891 Watt Ave., Sacramento

You are invited:

  • to learn more about our community outreach projects from their leaders
  • to get more involved by signing up for a committee or interest group
  • to bring an eligible friend or friends who might like to join
  • to hear from our scholarship recipients about their lives and goals
  • to learn more about campus sexual assaults and what CSUS is doing to prevent them
  • to see and chat with old friends and meet new ones
  • to help us keep things simple by eating at home and bringing your  beverage of choice to the meeting
Reva Wittenberg

Reva Wittenberg

Our slated guest speaker is Reva Wittenberg, Associate Director of Campus Wellness at California State University, Sacramento. Her department is primarily responsible for prevention programming, so she is deeply involved in preventing campus sexual assaults. She has also supervised the victim advocate on campus and been a core member of the cross-campus Title IX implementation team. She began her work in the field of sexual violence response and prevention in 1994 as a victim advocate with SafePlace and women’s self-defense instructor with Feminists In Self-Defense Training (F.I.S.T.) in Olympia, Wash. She has held leadership positions in several health-related programs in Washington State and California before coming to CSUS in 2014.

Sign up for the showcase for free here at Eventbrite.

Eventbrite - AAUW Sacramento Branch Fall Showcase for 2016-17

Fall Showcase – Mark Your Calendars! by Nancy McCabe

showcaseWhat:             Fall Showcase Branch Meeting

When:            Saturday, September 17, 9 – 11 am

Where:           Arden-Dimick Library,  891 Watt Avenue, Sacramento

 It’s almost time for our 2016-17 AAUW year to officially start.  As usual, we will kick off with our Showcase meeting, but we are planning some new features this time around. We will have presentations from Tech Trek, Scholarships, Funds, Public Policy and Speech Trek, and we hope to have an outside speaker who will talk about one of our important AAUW public policy issues. Check out the September Capital Ideas for more details.

Instead of having tables for all the interest groups, we will have one or two tables where you can sign up if you are interested in joining one of the groups. If you have an idea for a new interest group, please contact Interest Group Director Cherril Peabody right away (capeabody@comcast.net, (916) 973-0821) and tell her about it, so she can publicize it before the Showcase. Ideas don’t get implemented without leadership, though, so be prepared to chair the new group!

Sacramento Branch Members Visit Tech Trek Summer Camp at UC Davis by Linda Patterson

Tech Trek Campers

Tech Trek Campers

This year, the Sacramento AAUW Branch sent five students — Frankie XU, Kendra Sagara. Margaux Bautista, Alondra Chavez, and Emily Carmona — to the Tech Trek summer camp at UC Davis. Tech Trek is an experiential summer camp designed to pique the interest of eighth-grade girls in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). A group of Branch members were able to see the girls in action in several of the classes offered. The classes we visited included genetics, math and engineering, anatomy and physiology, and computer science. The girls were building bridges in engineering, dissecting lungs and learning about respiration in anatomy, creating apps for devices in computer science. All the girls we spoke with said they were having fun, learning new things, and were so happy to be there.

Tech Trekkers Deep in Discussion

Tech Trekkers Deep in Discussion

Since 1998, AAUW has helped change girls’ lives through Tech Trek. A 2013 survey of Tech Trek alumnae who attended the camp in California between 2006 and 2009 demonstrates the program’s lasting effects on many levels, including interest and confidence in STEM fields, decision to pursue STEM curricula and future career plans. For example, 82% of the girls chose to take more science classes in high school, 87% completed algebra and 77% pre-calculus, 73% enrolled in four-year college or university programs and 91% reported that Tech Trek boosted their self-confidence in their ability to be successful in science classes and 78% said the same for math classes.

Linda P. observes  a Tech Trekker in action

Linda P. observes a Tech Trekker in action

Later this year we hope to have some of the girls come to a Branch meeting to share their Tech Trek experiences.

Thank you to all members who supported Tech Trek this year and in years past. You can be assured that you made a wise investment in the futures of young girls.

AAUW and League of Women Voters to Host Voter Forum by Inger Linholm

women votersCalifornia Ballot Propositions can be confusing and are always plentiful.  This year, 17 measures will be put before the voter. On Saturday, Oct. 1, the AAUW Sacramento branch, in partnership with the League of Women Voters, will host a public forum to give voters an opportunity to listen to pros and cons in an effort to sort out the confusion. This event will be held from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. at the Robbie Waters Library in the Pocket.

Louise Einspahr of the League of Women Voters will coordinate the speakers and have some handouts available. Learn about the propositions, which range from public school Improvements to cigarette taxes to marijuana issues.

Be an informed participant by going online to:

http://www.sos.ca.gov/elections/ballot-measures/qualified-ballot-measures or https://ballotpedia.org/California_2016_ballot_propositions

Both of these sites will help you to learn more about these ballot measures. Selected propositions from the 17 will be discussed.

We are pleased to support the League of Women Voters, which has for many years worked to provide bipartisan voter information. 

Exploring Our Interest Groups – Cultural History Group by Cherril Peabody

The Cultural History group, formerly known as History of the World, looks at the early DNA of modern life, discussing innovations that have brought about social, economic and personal change. Members trace events and ideas as they have evolved over time to see how they are affecting our current lives and their prospects for the future. Members like to continue getting cultural historyto know each other, so each one comes to meetings with a new question for anyone who would like to answer about her own life as related to the topic, which often brings a lot of laughter. Some of the past and future topics from books we’ve read are lasers, women, noise, working solo or in networks, digital communication, chocolate, wine/beer, tea/coffee. The group chooses books with topics members are curious about but know little about initially. Rosa Lee Black is Chair of this group. Contact her at rosaleeblack99@yahoo.com.

Attention, Branch members: If you have an idea for a new interest group to start this fall, and especially if you are willing to chair the group if it gets going, please contact Interest Group Director Cherril Peabody, capeabody@comcast.net. We are planning to publicize ideas for new groups in advance of the Showcase Meeting and solicit members for them so we can hit the ground running in the fall. Thanks for your help!

WOW (Women of the World) will be returning this year to its original status as an interest group. As we are envisioning it, the group will have a set membership of 12 to 15 members and will plan three or four presentations for its membership only in members’ homes. Anne Rhodes has agreed to chair the group. She is starting to take names now for membership, so if you would like to join this group, contact her at rhodesmicasa@yahoo.com.

Leadership Demonstrated by Donna Holmes and Marty McKnew

Aug 2016 AAUW Funds ProgressMuch appreciation and many thanks to our Fundraising Co-Chairs and Past Presidents Ruth Burgess and Nancy Lawrence. Their most recent efforts have centered on our 100th Anniversary Grant. Nancy and Ruth have presented all our past presidents with the challenge to complete our grant by our 100th anniversary in 2020. They obtained pledges at the past presidents luncheon or by letter and made sure the money arrived. To date, they have brought in $9,600! Here is our updated thermometer!

We know many of you also sent in donations with your dues, and those efforts will be highlighted next month. So, even without those donations, we have reached 65% of our goal in just under four years. ($48,566.93 out of $75,000)

Thank you!

Our 2016-2017 Budget Needs Branch Approval by May Ruth Lynch

budget clipartThe Board of Directors has approved the budget for fiscal year 2016-2017 (click here to review). Branch members are asked to review the proposed budget, which will be voted on at the September Showcase. We are taking $1,000 from reserves to cover expenses for 2016-17. Because officers made contributions instead of submitting all expenses in 2014-15, we put approx $1,100 into reserves at the end of fiscal year 2015. We are taking this amount out to cover expenses for 2016-17. In 2017-18, we will be able to cover expenses from the dues increase of $4.

Please direct any questions or suggestions to May Ruth Lynch at (916) 382-4412 or mayrlynch@comcast.net.

 

Membership Matters by Pat Winkle and Shirley Wheeler

Please welcome our newest AAUW Sacramento Branch members.Welcome New Members

JANIS MACLAY received her AA degree in Science from Cotley College and her BS in Nursing from the University of Nebraska. Janis has been an active member in AAUW and recently moved to Elk Grove from New Mexico. She also has recently become an honorary life member.

JULIA MACLAY received her BA in Political Economy of Industrial Societies from University of California, Berkeley and her MA in Economics from American University. Julia is a retired Project Manager and lives in Sacramento. She is a life member of AAUW.

BRANDI VEAL is an AAUW Scholarship recipient. She is a student at California State University, Sacramento, majoring in Business Administration. Brandi also works part time as a Library Assistant.

Our AAUW Sacramento Branch welcomed 31 members in the 2015-16 membership years. Several were returning members. Thank you to the many members who referred a person to join us.

Women’s Influence on Voting by Eileen Heaser

woment votersAfter 1980 women began voting in larger numbers than men: 10% more women than men voted. Women vote for more liberal and democratic causes, such as health care and welfare, firearm restrictions, pro-abortion rights, and family-centered issues.

In 2013 when Washington, D.C. was about to shut down, twenty female senators, led by Susan Collins, met and proposed a plan which resulted in halting the shutdown.  Partisan politics was put aside. This is only one example of how women function effectively in D.C.  Women congressional members explain that they work well together, look for common ground, are disinclined to grandstand, stay open to new ideas, are collegial and listen. They get people in a room and talk.  In D.C. there is a congressional women’s club, formed 20 years ago by Barbara Mikulski, to provide a “zone of civility”.  They meet for lunches, have bridal and baby showers and play dates for their children. As of 2013, women chaired ten of the twenty Senate Committees.  They pushed through legislation to fund women and children’s health research, testing and treatment, passed the Lilly-Ledbetter Fair Pay Act and other anti-discrimination laws, mandated maternity and family medical leave and homemakers IRA [stay-at-home parents are allowed to deduct contributions from retirement plans].  Funding for Planned Parenthood was sustained. Gender-blind legislation passed by women included Stabenow’s farm bill, Boxer’s transportation and water resources bill, Murray’s budget and Mikulski’s appropriations bills.

In Broad Influence: How Women are Changing the Way America Works, 2016, author Jay Newton-Small emphasized that women have innate qualities that make their leadership different from men and more effective as they are more prepared and collaborative.  As women are reaching  the “critical mass” of 20-30% representation in any work place: military, private industry, government, their voices can be heard, thus advancing women’s issues and opportunities.  However, barriers still exist: harassment, a society that emphasizes the importance of appearance over intellect and skill, a reluctance to speak-up, etc,

We can use our power at the polls to put more women in public office. The more women we have in these positions of influence, the stronger our voices will become.